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stitchcounting:

Christ has risen!

Remember Easter has nothing to do with rabbits but if you are thinking of getting one today, they poo, pee and eat a lot. They can also live through 8-10 Easter Sundays. Just think it through

Source: stitchcounting
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http://karenkavett.tumblr.com/post/83312191047/alandistro-observingkatherine-exoticwild

alandistro:

observingkatherine:

exoticwild:

What I’m really terrified of is leading an average, ordinary life with a regular job and an invariable routine, planned holidays, an average household, fixed responsibilities and not doing anything different to be remembered by.

This…

Source: exoticwild
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fahrlight:

fahrlight:

fahrlight:

fahrlight:

fahrlight:

fahrlightloki:

fahrlight:

jimthewebspinner:

fahrlight:

keepcalmandthunderfrost:

keepcalmandthunderfrost:

fahrlight:

This was after he kneeled before me (no kidding).

Story of my awesome day follows soon, and it’s a looong story.

HE KNEELED BEFORE YOU?

JESUS FUCKING SHIT FUCK, TOM.

SOMEONE FIND THAT MAN A DOM.

*cough, cough*

how can this have like 23.000 reblogs?!? HOW?! Thank you so much guys!

by the way, there’s a video now! 

Anyone got any more pictures or videos of this little moment!?

it got better!

thank you ALL for reblogging this baby!

Sorry guys, but my anemia bothers me so much, I need to push my ego a little. XD

Source: fahrlight
Link

http://ehmeegee.tumblr.com/post/83313602045/edwardspoonhands-sleepywinchesters

edwardspoonhands:

sleepywinchesters:

edwardspoonhands:

Sometimes when I’m making a video, I realize that I’m forcing myself to have a unique opinion on a topic when, in fact, it isn’t an honest opinion….it’s just me searching for something interesting to say. That’s OK, I guess,…

Source: edwardspoonhands
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sciencechicks:

dendroica:

Rachel Carson

Though she did not set out to do so, Carson influenced the environmental movement as no one had since the 19th century’s most celebrated hermit, Henry David Thoreau, wrote about Walden Pond. “Silent Spring” presents a view of nature compromised by synthetic pesticides, especially DDT. Once these pesticides entered the biosphere, Carson argued, they not only killed bugs but also made their way up the food chain to threaten bird and fish populations and could eventually sicken children. Much of the data and case studies that Carson drew from weren’t new; the scientific community had known of these findings for some time, but Carson was the first to put them all together for the general public and to draw stark and far-reaching conclusions. In doing so, Carson, the citizen-scientist, spawned a revolution.

“Silent Spring,” which has sold more than two million copies, made a powerful case for the idea that if humankind poisoned nature, nature would in turn poison humankind. “Our heedless and destructive acts enter into the vast cycles of the earth and in time return to bring hazard to ourselves,” she told the subcommittee. We still see the effects of unfettered human intervention through Carson’s eyes: she popularized modern ecology.

If anything, environmental issues have grown larger — and more urgent — since Carson’s day. Yet no single work has had the impact of “Silent Spring.” It is not that we lack eloquent and impassioned environmental advocates with the capacity to reach a broad audience on issues like climate change. Bill McKibben was the first to make a compelling case, in 1989, for the crisis of global warming in “The End of Nature.” Elizabeth Kolbert followed with “Field Notes From a Catastrophe.” Al Gore sounded the alarm with “An Inconvenient Truth,” and was awarded the Nobel Prize. They are widely considered responsible for shaping our view of global warming, but none was able to galvanize a nation into demanding concrete change in quite the way that Carson did.

(via How ‘Silent Spring’ Ignited the Environmental Movement - NYTimes.com)

Silent Spring was published on September 27, 1962 — 50 years ago today.

Reblogging for the 50th anniversary of her death today, April 14, 1964.

(via themarysue)

Source: The New York Times
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iwasbornhuman:

shaboogami:

ultrabatsexybananas:

cannabiskitties:

Holy shit our lungs are crazy

I don’t know whether to be disgusted or amazed…

WHOA 

According to military training, you can blow into the esophagus and inflate cow lungs and use them as a flotation device. I have no idea why you be in a situation where you come across a dead cow right when you need to cross a large body of water, but hey, the more you know.

(via ladyelora)

Source: arsanatomica
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skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

Source: skunkbear